Fantasia Fest 2018: 4 Films We're Stoked On (And A Few More That Seem Intriguing As Hell)

If you haven't been keeping up with festival news lately, Fantasia Fest has been dropping some mighty exciting lineups on fans of horror, science fiction, and everything that orbits the two. With three full waves finally announced, we're here to tell you what four films have got us waiting anxiously for the well known film circuit and a few more than seem a little bonkers, in the best way possible.


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Mandy

We have already ranted about Mandy a lot. Coming from the exciting (possibly visionary) director, Panos Cosmatos, and starring Nicolas Cage, Mandy looks to be a blood soaked nightmare with a chainsaw soundtrack and we're so on board.

Nightmare Cinema

An anthology film that's been in the works forever, Nightmare Cinema uses the supernaturally charming wraparound of a group of friends meeting at a forgotten, haunted bijou being shown films by Mickey Rourke. Well, Mickey Rourke as The Projectionist. Five stories, five directors. Oh yeah, and the directors are Joe Dante, Mick Garris, Ryuhei Kitamura, David Slade and Alejandro Brugues. This one is a must see.

Puppet Master: The Littlest Reich

With an insanely intelligent and controversial movie, Puppet Master is going straight heel by bringing in full in Nazi's. Written by Bone Tomahawk director, Craig S. Zahler, starring Udo Kier and Barbara Crampton, this is sure to be the highest profile entry in the series ever.

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Searching

A few companies have explored "cybernatural" territory, basically yet another new route for found footage to take. While some have found a modicum of success, we are big fans of Blumhouse's Unfriended, the John Cho vehicle Searching looks to be upping the ante. The trailer is a tense, pulse pounding look at what the film has to offer and with such a fantastic lead, it's easy to get excited.

And now for some shorts, films and experiences that have piqued our interest

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Alexandre Aja's Campfire Creepers

Aja made a name for himself as part of the mid-aught's "splat pack," proving his worth with a solid remake of Wes Craven's The Hills Have Eyes and Joe Dante's Piranha as well as helming his own High Tension, Aja is a splatterpunk mastermind. With Campfire Creepers, Aja has made two virtual reality experiences with Midnight March and The Skull of Sam. Starring the legend himself, Robert Englund, Aja is pushing the boundaries of filmmaking in new and exciting ways.

Catcalls

A nine minute short about women from women. After a man cruising for women in a demeaning manner gets caught up in some monstrous justice, it's a self proclaimed "FUCK YOU" to street harassers.

Chuck Steel: Night of the Trampires

A full length claymation feature from the U.K., Chuck Steel is the best cop on the force in the mean streets of L.A. in 1989. Four years after a short based on the same character, Mike Mort is delivering a bombastic action-horror genre mash featuring, you guessed it, vampire hobos. 

The Field Guide to Evil

Anthologies are (usually) a lot of fun and the premise here is aces. Exploring folklore from different countries, Field Guide takes a look at legends from Turkey, Poland, America, Greece and more. What's the cherry on top? Shorts from the directors of films such as The LureGoodnight MommyBerberian Sound Studio, and more. 

Laplace's Witch

It's a murder mystery. It's supernatural. It's Takashi Miike. We're not going to not be interested.

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Punk Samurai Slash Down

I...I don't even know how to describe this. I'm going to copy-paste the Fantasia site description and let your imagination go wild.

The metafictional mania of Japanese punk rocker-cum-author Ko Machida’s 2004 jidai shosetsu (period novel) rips up the silver screen in PUNK SAMURAI SLASH DOWN. Loaded with loopy weirdness and jolts of anachronistic rock ’n’ roll energy, the cinematic adaptation by Gakuryu Ishii (GOJOEELECTRIC DRAGON 80000V) is colourful, anarchic and irreverent – as you’d expect, given his bona fides as a key instigator of Japan’s punk-film eruption of the ’80s (collaborating here with screenwriter Kankuro Kudo, of TOO YOUNG TO DIE! fame).

The metafictional mania of Japanese punk rocker-cum-author Ko Machida’s 2004 jidai shosetsu (period novel) rips up the silver screen in PUNK SAMURAI SLASH DOWN. Loaded with loopy weirdness and jolts of anachronistic rock ’n’ roll energy, the cinematic adaptation by Gakuryu Ishii (GOJOE, ELECTRIC DRAGON 80000V) is colourful, anarchic and irreverent – as you’d expect, given his bona fides as a key instigator of Japan’s punk-film eruption of the ’80s (collaborating here with screenwriter Kankuro Kudo, of TOO YOUNG TO DIE! fame).

All of this and more. This isn't even counting the films we have already have the pleasure and privlege to view, such as The Ranger and Summer of '84. What a great time to be a genre fan and film lover. Keep your eyes open for reviews, coming soon!